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8 thoughts on “ Kyrie - Christe - Kyrie (Dalla Messa Cunctipotens Genitor Deus) - Polifonica Ambrosiana Dir. Mons. Giuseppe Biella - Mille Ans de Chants Sacrés (Vinyl, LP)

  1. Kyrie Eleison (Greek for "Lord have mercy"; the Latin transliteration supposes a pronunciation as in Modern Greek) is a very old, even pre-Christian, expression used constantly in all Christian liturgies. Arrian quotes it in the second century: "Invoking God we say Kyrie Eleison" (Diatribæ Epicteti, II, 7).A more obvious precedent for Christian use was the occurrence of the same formula in.
  2. Kyrie, the vocative case of the Greek word kyrios (“lord”). The word Kyrie is used in the Septuagint, the earliest Greek translation of the Old Testament, to translate the Hebrew word emfolpartlictioplos.wabnostneltagsgasidedenbuconkinghind.infoinfo the New Testament, Kyrie is the title given to Christ, as in Philippians As part of the Greek formula Kyrie eleison (“Lord, have mercy”), the word is used as a preliminary petition before a.
  3. The Kyrie appears in Bach's "Mass" in the first part, known as the "Missa." In it, the "Kyrie Eleison" and "Christe Eleison" are played back and forth by sopranos and strings, then build up to a four-part choir. It sets the stage perfectly for the voluminous Gloria, which follows it.
  4. Kyrie Eleison. From the Catholic Encyclopedia. Kyrie Eleison (Greek for "Lord have mercy"; the Latin transliteration supposes a pronunciation as in Modern Greek) is a very old, even pre-Christian, expression used constantly in all Christian liturgies.
  5. The Roman Catholic Latin Mass begins with the Introit, which is followed by the Kyrie, or, more properly, Kyrie Eleison. It is the only part of the mass not in Latin. Its Greek text is brief: Kyrie Eleison; Christe Eleison; Kyrie Eleison, which translates to, "Lord have mercy, Christ have mercy, Lord have mercy.".
  6. Sep 20,  · The Confiteor, followed by the Kyrie Eleison, and then the words of absolution; The Kyrie Eleison in the form of a trope (an invocation preceding the Kyrie Eleison and Christe Eleison parts), followed by the words of absolution. The verses and responses: V. Have mercy on us, O Lord. R. For we have sinned against you. V. Show us, O Lord, your.
  7. Nov 12,  · In the Middle Ages the Kyrie was constantly farced with other words to fill up the long neums. The names of the various Kyries in the Vatican Gradual (for instance, Kyrie Cunctipotens genitor Deus of the tenth century, Kyrie magnæ Deus potentiæ of the thirteenth century, etc.) are still traces of this. As an example of these innumerable and.
  8. Kyrie, a transliteration of Greek Κύριε, vocative case of Κύριος (), is a common name of an important prayer of Christian liturgy, also called the Kyrie eleison (/ ˈ k ɪər i eɪ ɪ ˈ l eɪ ɪ s ɒ n,-s ən / KEER-ee-ay il-AY-iss-on, -⁠ən; Ancient Greek: Κύριε, ἐλέησον, romanized: Kýrie eléēson, lit. 'Lord, have mercy').

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